The Importance of a Music Education

Why Music Matters in School

The benefits of integrating music into primary school curriculum are far reaching, and impact on many areas of school life. 

Warwick Music Group's Education Ambassador Becca Pope, draws on her experience of managing music in a primary school, and explores just some of the reasons why music is so important to include in your school environment.

  1. Why should music be a part of the primary curriculum?
  2. How will it benefit the children?
  3. Will including music in your daily teaching have an impact on behaviour?
  4. Are there opportunities to connect with other schools through music?
  5. Can you use music in other subjects?
  6. What is the best way to incorporate music into the classroom?
  7. Will having music help the children’s confidence in other areas?
  8. Does music really help the children to achieve better results?
  9. Would we need to assess the children?
  10. Do you need to be able to read music/play an instrument to teach this to the children?
  11. Can background music in the classroom help to create a calm working environment?

Why should music be a part of the primary curriculum?

There are many different reasons why music should be a part of the primary curriculum. Not least that every child enjoys music, whether it be the latest chart hit or the music that their parent’s listen to at home. It is a subject that is in everyone’s lives, making their favourite movie better or listening to the radio on the way to school.

How will it benefit the children?

Even if you leave aside the countless studies which list the benefits to children’s learning and attainment, some of which you can read about in our links later on in the page. Other benefits can include improvement in behaviour, in morale and the confidence of the children.

Will including music in your daily teaching have an impact on behaviour?

Participating in a fun group activity each day can really help the class feel like a team, which can have a real impact on behaviour as a whole. Also having attainable goals, however small, can really boost confidence which, in turn can impact on behaviour as a whole.

Are there opportunities to connect with other schools through music?

There are many opportunities to connect with other schools through music, whether it be an inter-schools concert where you can show what you have been doing, or a Music Hub led day where schools that have been doing whole class music come together to play in a bigger venue. There are then celebrations on a larger scale which include ‘Young Voices’ where the school choir can come together with other to perform in arenas, or ‘Come and Play with The Halle’ for instrumental players.

Can you use music in other subjects?

Music is incredibly versatile and cross curricular. To name a few you can go to Science, History, Geography, Art, Maths, English, the list is endless.

What is the best way to incorporate music into the classroom?

A great way to have music in the classroom every day is singing. From singing the register to an end of day song, times tables or topic related. When you feel confident incorporating music into everyday life at school it may be time to investigate playing instruments, maybe peripatetic lessons or whole class tuition.

Will having music help the children’s confidence in other areas?

I have always been amazed at how the power of music can build children in ways other subjects can’t. From making them more engaged in other subjects to allowing shy children to perform as part of a band, choir or even by themselves with a real sense of achievement.

Does music really help the children to achieve better results?

There are a number of studies that prove the impact that music can have on children at school. I have copied some links below for greater depth reading.

Would we need to assess the children?

It is a great planning tool to assess the children every term or so but if you don’t feel confident doing so without help there are some great online resources which tie in with the National Curriculum.

Do you need to be able to read music/play an instrument to teach this to the children?

It is good to have some experience about reading and playing music if you are going to teach the children yourselves but if you are going to have a specialist music teacher come in the children often love that you are learning alongside them.

Can background music in the classroom help to create a calm working environment?

I have always found this to be the case, obviously you need to choose your music carefully as some is not appropriate and can have the opposite effect. It can be a great talking point as well, discussing what the music is and who composed it, can they guess the composer?

Further Reading

  1. The Guardian: How to improve the school results
  2. The Pennthorpe Buzzers claim BBE prize